Chronicle of a Death Foretold

by

Chronicle of a Death Foretold

Author: Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Title: Chronicle of a Death Foretold
Genre: Latin American/Colombian fiction, literary fiction
Publication Date: 1981, 1982 (translation)
Geographic Setting:Colombia
Time Period: Modern; Early 20th Century
Series: N/A
Plot:
A man returns to the town that a brutal murder occurred 27 years earlier in order to get to the bottom of it. If everyone knew Angela Vicario’s twin brothers were going to murder Santiago Nasar for dishonoring her, why did no one stop it? The more the story unfolds, the less is understood and at the end not only are the two murderers put on trial, but also the entire society.
Subject HeadingsDeath–Fiction; Honor–Fiction; Murder–Fiction; Revenge–Fiction; Colombia–Fiction
Appeal Terms:first person narrative, honor, revenge, murder, depictions of Colombian life, male/female relations, family relations, culture clashes, marriage, Colombian society, violence, flashbacks, violence, justice
Red Flags: violence against women, graphic murder, blood and guts, strong language
Read Alikes:
Fiction:
A tale of the dispossessed by Laura Restrepo: (depictions of Colombian life, violence, male/female relations, Colombian society)
The Thief and the Dogs by Naguib Mahfouz: (violence, murder, justice, revenge)
Hamlet by William Shakespeare: (revenge, murder, family relations, justice)
<Non-Fiction:
Columbia by Sarah Woods: A Bradt travel guide about the people and culture of Colombia.
Killing Pablo: The Hunt for the World’s Greatest Outlaw by Mark Bowden: The rise and fall of real life Colombian cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar and how his network of terror kept the entire country hostage.
Unto the Daughters: The Legacy of an Honor Killing in a Sicilian-American Family by Karen Tintori: “But Josie had a sister that nobody spoke of. Her name was Frances, and at age sixteen, she fell in love with a young barber. Her father wanted her to marry an older don in the neighborhood mafia–a marriage that would give his sons a leg up in the mob. But Frances eloped with her barber. And when she returned a married woman, her father and brothers killed her for it. Her family then erased her from its collective memory. Even 80 years and two generations later, Frances and her death were not spoken of, her name was erased from the family genealogy, her pictures burned, and her memory suppressed.”
Name: Michelle B

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