Kill Me if You Can

by

Author: James Patterson & Marshall Karp

Title: Kill Me if You Can

Genre: Suspense

Publication Date: 2011

Number of Pages: 361

Geographical Setting: New York City; Paris; Amsterdam

Time Period: Contemporary

Series: Not applicable

Plot Summary: Matthew Bannon’s life changes the day he is at Grand Central Station and finds a bag filled with diamonds. An ex-marine and a struggling art student, it seems like his luck is changing, until he realizes that two of the world’s greatest assassins Marta Krall and the elusive Ghost are hunting him and his girlfriend, Katherine. Now his and Katherine’s lives are at stake, and as they try to stay two steps ahead, Matthew learns the price of trying to change his luck. An unraveling, suspenseful plot that from the first paragraph grabs the reader’s attention. The worldwide manhunt for Matthew Bannon keeps him and the reader’s on their toes. The plot twists are unexpected and unfold at the height of the action, only causing the action to increase tenfold. The romance, the assassins, and the antihero protagonist are all a hook that will cause any reader to become addicted to Patterson’s work.

Subject Headings: College students — Fiction. Art students — Fiction. Assassins — Fiction. Diamonds — Fiction. Revenge — Fiction. New York (N.Y.) — Fiction. Suspense fiction. Suspense fiction.

Appeal: compelling, gritty, hard-edged, suspenseful, multiple points of view, vivd, plot twists, multiple plot lines, sexually explicit, strong language

3 terms that best describes this book: breakneck pacing, action-oriented, engaging characters

3 Nonfiction Read-a-likes:

Red Mafiya: How the Russian Mob has Invaded America, by Robert Friedman

A journalist tells the story of the Russian mob during the fall of Soviet Russia to their infiltration of the United States. The book discusses the mob’s role in the financial world, drug trafficking, weapons sales, etc. If you were interested in the Russian mob in Kill Me if You Can, then this book will is great for background history.

Blood Diamonds: Tracing the Deadly Path of the World’s Most Precious Stones, by Greg Campbell

A freelance journalist describes the destruction done to the community surrounding the Sierra Leone diamond mines. Three to four percent of all diamonds sold are smuggled and mined in war zones, at the expense of the resident’s lives. The diamond trade plays an integral role in Kill Me if You Can, and this book will help Patterson readers understand about this black-market business.

Making the Corps, by Thomas E. Ricks

Follow a platoon through their first year of Marine Corp training, from when they arrive at Parris Island, to their first year as members of the Corp. In this tenth anniversary edition read the new afterward from the author. Matthew Bannon learned all his fighting skills from the marines, now read about real live marines who endured the same training

3 Fiction Read-a-likes:

Rules of Deception, by Christopher Reich

After the death of his wife, Dr. Jonathan Ransom receives a mysterious note that sets in motion a world-wide manhunt for him. Along the way, he discovers that his wife had many secrets that he struggles to unveil. A good choice if you liked Kill me if You Can’s fast-paced manhunt.

The Bourne Identity, by Robert Ludlum

An amnesia victim wakes up to the name Jason Bourne, hired by a U.S. Government agency to assassinate his rival Carlos. A good read-a-like for readers who like to read about hired assassins like in Kill Me if You Can.

What Doesn’t Kill You, by Iris Johansen

CIA operative Catherine Ling is on the hunt for Hu Chang who creates a deadly drug that others are hunting him for. Now Catherine has to try and protect Hu Chang, her mentor growing up, from those who want to take the new drug for themselves. A good read for those who enjoy the break-neck speed of Patterson’s work and stories about assassins.

Name: Alison Kulczak

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