Posts Tagged ‘Archetypal’

Nathan’s Run

May 26, 2010
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Author: John Gilstrap

Title: Nathan’s Run

Genre: thriller (crime thriller)

Publication Date: 1996

Plot Summary: 12 year old Nathan Bailey is an escaped murderer. He stabbed his prison guard to death and is now on the loose in Virginia. The whole book is based around this basic problem, but goes to different perspectives of the people who get embroiled in the investigation. There is Warren, who is the lieutenant of the local police department and the detective on the case. His own son died the previous year and he is obviously still dealing with his grief as he draws connections between Nathan and his own son, making him more sympathetic to the fugitive as the case unfolds. We see Nathan’s perspective as he is trying to  remain at large and uncaptured, thinks through his crimes and motives, and tells his story to the radio host, “The Bitch.” Monica is the radio host who receives Nathan’s call as she is discussing his escape and murder on her radio show. Nathan’s Uncle Mark, who had custody of him before his initial arrest is featured and he has an interesting part in the plot (which I won’t give away).

Subject Headings:

Boy murder suspects, Orphans, Fugitives, Juvenile justice system, Suspense stories

Appeals: compelling, emotionally-charged, sarcastic, philosophical, archetypal, multiple points of view, character-centered, puzzle, cinematic, episodic, issue-oriented, strong language, thought-provoking, sad, simple, straightforward, jaded

3 words to describe book: fugitive, multiple perspectives, philosophical

Read a likes:

Fiction

The Client -John Grisham

This book is similar to Nathan’s Run, in that a kid is being tracked by organized crime because of a crime he witnessed. This is slightly different in that it is also a lawyer type of thriller. Mark is 11. He witnesses a guy who tries to kill himself by gassing himself in his car in the woods. Mark and his little brother, Ricky, are in the woods at the time. Ricky goes into shock and has to be institutionalized. Mark tries to stop the guy. The man, before he shoots himself, tells Mark that he is a lawyer who was defending a mafia person. The mafia man killed a senator and the lawyer tells Mark where the body is. So now, Mark has to help his brother and save his family, without being killed by the mafia tying up loose ends. The family gets the eccentric lawyer, Reggie Love, to try and end the chaos before they all end up dead.

New York Dead – Stuart Woods

This is the first book in the Stone Barrington series. Stone Barrington is a humble detective in a snotty setting. On Manhattan’s Upper East Side, irresistibly famous and sexy Sasha falls 12 stories from her condo right in front of Stone… He always seems to be in the middle of the action. But, she is still alive. When her ambulance gets into a crash, she disappears. Stone doesn’t believe that Sasha’s lesbian lover is the killer, so he goes beyond the NYPD investigations to find out himself. This is a read alike for those who like melodramtic detective thrillers with sexual undertones.

The Bone Collector – Jeffery Deaver

This is the first book in the Lincoln Rhyme series. Lincoln Rhyme is the main character throughout these series, who is a criminologist (famous and extraordinary in the novel’s world). He gets in a bad accident which scared him and injured him. He cannot rest, though, because a serial killer is on the loose. He and his side kick Amelia Sachs go through New York City following clues the egotistical killer leaves behind on purpose. This is good if you like another thriller with a sexual tension and a puzzle to solve.

NF

Juvenile – Joseph Rodriguez

This addresses the philosophical controversy thread throughout the book about juveniles in prison, what it’s like, and the issues behind it. In Gilstrap’s novel, the radio host and callers, as well as the detective and his family discuss whether Nathan is to blame and how he should be punished.

Hidden evidence: Forty true crimes and how forensic science helped to solve them – David Owen

This discusses how detectives solve crimes. In Gilstrap’s book, Warren is the detective in the book trying to find Nathan, the boy killer, based on clues and leads he finds throughout the books. Readers would want to see how real detectives do this.

Villains’ paradise: A history of Britain’s Underworld – Donald Thomas

True crime of organized crime, including mafia and gangs. This is for people who like to read about history. It also involves crime, which is the basis for Gilstrap’s thriller.

The Gunslinger by Stephen King

May 27, 2009

 

 

Author: King, Stephen

Title: Gunslinger

Genre: Fantasy/Science Fiction/Western

Publication Date:  1982

Number of Pages:  315

Geographical Setting: All-World, a kind of dystopia similar to the Old West

Time Period: Undetermined future?

Series: The Dark Tower Series (Book 1 of 7)

Plot Summary: Roland Deschain is the last gunslinger in a parallel universe very similar to the Old West. He is on a quest to catch “the man in black,” the one who will lead him to the Dark Tower. Roland recounts, to a farmer, his visit to Tull, a town of people who didn’t trust him and Roland was forced to kill them all, including his love, Alice. Roland continues his journey in the desert and is helped at a station by a man named Jake. Roland finds out Jake’s past before he died in our universe. They travel together, and Roland rescues Jake from an oracle and then proceeds to bond with the oracle to find out more about the Dark Tower. Additionally, details about Roland’s past are revealed. Roland and Jake travel together, but Jake does not trust Roland. When Roland is faced with a decision to continue the pursuit of “the man in black” or let Jake die, Roland decides to pursue “the man in black,” letting Jake fall to his death. The action culminates when Roland and “the man and black” have a confrontation at “Golgotha” where “the man in black” tells Roland of his future, revealing snippets and events that will occur in subsequent books. Roland wakes up next to a pile of bones and a black cloak and continues his journey.

Subject Headings: Fantasy Fiction – American, Good and Evil – Fiction, Roland (Ficticious character – King), Adventure Stories

Appeal: Dark, Brooding, Suspenseful, Dystopic, Survival, Betrayal, Fast-paced, Multi-layered, Intricate setting, Horror, Bleak hero,  Tragic, Good versus Evil, Archetypal

3 Terms: Macabre, Survival, Betrayal

Relevant Fiction: Weaveworld by Clive Barker would be a good choice for fans of The Dark Tower, it combines adventure and fantasy with the same dark undertones used in The Gunslinger. Watchers by Dean Koontz also combines a suspenseful chase with supernatural elements. The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, though intended for younger readers, would definitely satisfy a lover of The Gunslinger, with its supernatural, suspenseful, and horror themes.

Relevant Nonfiction: Tales of the Wild West by B. Byron Price is a collection of real stories of the old West.  The Road to the Dark Tower: Exploring Stephen King’s Magnum Opus by Bev Vincent is companion material to the Dark Tower series explain its origins and development

Stephen King’s The Dark Tower: A Concordance by Robin Furth is another companion material explaining the words, terms, and phrases used in the the Dark Tower series.

Name: Stephen Koebel