Posts Tagged ‘Gunfights’

Brimstone

September 26, 2012
Author: Robert B. Parker
Title: Brimstone
Genre: Western
Publication Date: May 5th 2009
Number of Pages: 304 pages or 5 hours and 5 minutes on 4 CD’s
Geographical Setting: Texas, United States
Time Period: 19th Century American West
Series (If applicable): Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch; book 3
Plot Summary: The third book in the Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch series, followings the two gun-men for hire to Brimstone. After finding Virgil’s sweetheart Allie French in a brothel the three decide to start life over in the town of Brimstone. Cole and Hitch are hired on as two deputies to keep the peace in town. Things get shaky as Brother Percival sets out to shut down all the saloons in town and help Allie become a changed woman. A strange Indian appears and kidnaps two women. Pike the owner of Pike’s Palace (the best saloon in town) is not taking any of Percival’s nonsense and intends on staying in business. Can the two deputies keep the peace before anyone gets hurt? Or is murder and gunfights inevitably in the near future? With deals gone wrong, lovers gone astray and men working for both sides, this western novel has something in it to please everyone.
Subject Headings: Former Lovers; Contract Killers; Triangles (Interpersonal relations); Houses of prostitution; Redemption; Change (Psychology); Murder; Violence in men; Gunfights; Protectiveness in men; Small town life—The West (United States); Cole, Virgil; Hitch, Everett
Appeal: Gritty, Fast-paced, Lawmen, Cowboys, Indians, Small Western towns, Gunfights, Men-Friendships, First-Person Narrative, Dialog Driven, Character Detailed, Detailed Setting
3 appeal terms that best describe this book: Gunfights, Character Detailed, First-Person Narrative
Three Fiction Read-a-likes:
1. The Sisters Brothers (May 2011) by Patrick deWitt
This fast-paced, darkly humorous western follows the two guns for hire, Eli and Charlie Sister on a mission to kill Herman Kermit Warm. As told through Eli’s narration, along the way the men encounter many adventures some involving a bear and Indians. Like Brimstone this novel is told in First-person narrative and involves the story of two guns for hire.
2.  The Virginian: a horseman of the plains (Apr 2002) by Owen Wister
The first true western written, this story follows the life of a cowboy on a cattle ranch in Wyoming. With episodes of violence, hate, revenge, friendship and romance, you get a feel of what life was like back in the 19th century. Containing many of the same elements as Brimstone it would be an interesting look at the first western written and how it paved the way for future stories to unfold.
3. The Palo Duro Trail (Nov 2004) by Jory Sherman
A man hired to move 4,000 cattle along the Palo Duro Trail faces many obstacles along the way, including; harsh weather, Comanches and a hired killer. Like Brimstone both characters in these books deal with Native Americans and others who want to kill them.
Three Nonfiction Read-a-likes:
1. Wyatt Earp: the life behind the legend (Sep. 1997) by Casey Tefertiller
Using primary sources and personal accounts by people who knew Wyatt Earp, Casey Tefertiller tries to tell the true story of the legendary lawman. What really happened at Tombstone, Arizona during that famous gunfight? With elements of true history involving real men of the law, you can see first hand what a marshal would be up against, just like what Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch experienced.
2. Draw: the greatest gunfights of the American West (2003) by James Reasoner
In this book myths and legends of Hollywood do not apply. Only the truth on how those who lived to serve the law, fight the law and died by the gun are told. Like the gunfights in Brimstone this book details real life gunfights of the west.
3. Tough towns: true tales from the gritty streets of the old west (Nov 2006) by Robert Barr Smith
Citizens living in small western towns banned together to fight against lawbreakers and protect their towns. Like Brimstone this books tells the tales of small towns and the people who became heros in their own time.
Name: Madison Gailus

Hondo

March 19, 2009

Author: Louis L’Amour

Title: Hondo

Genre: Western

Publication Date:  1953

Number of Pages: 179

Geographical Setting:  Southwestern Arizona

Time Period: Post-Civil War (1870’s)

 

Plot Summary: Hondo Lane is a quick trigger, part Indian cowboy that travels alone across the deserts of Southern Arizona.  Occasionally picking up some work scouting for the military he occasionally will have run-ins with the Apache Indians, who are at this point trying to clear out all white men from their territory.  As a reader you get a sense of a lone man in the desert with his rough looking lone dog both dangerous as all get out, yet in need of settling down with a woman and in one permanent place.  Testosterone and tension fill the story with bar fights, Indian confrontations, battles, surprises and a little bit of love.  Danger is constant throughout the book as the woman that Hodo Lane meets lives on dangerous Apache territory and he needs to try and convince her to move to safety.  Unable to direct all of his attention to her due to his business for the army and also his own feelings of independence, he continues on to his destination.  Hondo wants to make his way back to the woman, but there will be Indians, a robber, and also the woman’s husband in his path.  Indian capture, vengeance, death, and the unforgiving desert lie in Hondo’s path to save the woman’s life and get his life onto the right path.

 

Subject Headings: Cowboys, Apache Indians, Arizona, Western Stories, Pioneer women, Insurgency, Ranches, Lone men, Gunmen, Indian raids, Desert tracking, Indian Tracking. Post-Civil War West, Army Scouts, Man and Dog relationships.

 

Appeal: intriguing; adventurous; fast-paced; suspenseful; character driven; dramatic; plot twists; resolved ending; scenic; dangerous; ruthless; traditional; accurate; historical details; details of Indian territory in the West, Army moving into Indian territory, surviving in the desert, living on a Ranch, Indian lifestyle, gambling, Indian/Army battles.

 

Similar Authors and Works:

Fiction: Comanche Moon by Larry McMurtry.  Western takes the view point of an Indian point of few, 19th century, Texas rangers, trackers, pioneer life, desert, little bit of love.

Riders of the Purple Sage by Zane Grey.  Western, Rangers, Gunfighters, Woman ranchers, vengeance, strong male character.

Centennial by James A. Michener.  History of Native Americans and white settlers, descriptive of the land, homesteaders, pioneer life, western story, historical. This book is more about the place than any character.  A different perspective on the world Hondo lived in.

Non-Fiction: Cochise: the life and times of the great Apache Chief by Peter Aleshire.  Story of the only Native American to win a battle against the Americans.  Historical details of the Apache and the white settlers.

George Scarborough: The life and death of a lawman on the closing frontier by Robert K. DeArment. Story of a frontier gunmen and his role in settling the New Mexico and Arizona territories.

American nomads: travels with lost conquistadors, mountain men, cowboys, Indians, hoboes and bull riders by Richard Grant.  Story of a British journalist recounts his life wandering throughout the U.S. and realities of America’s nomads and other characters.

Name: Emily