Posts Tagged ‘sympathetic’

Memoirs of Geisha

September 26, 2012

Title: Memoirs of a Geisha

Author: Arthur, Golden

Publication Date: 1999

Time Period: Japan – 1920s to the 1940s.

Genre: Historical Fiction

Pages: 503

Plot Summary: Arthur Golden weaves a compelling story in this memoir about a poor girl Sayuri sold and taken to the big city and is forced into a  kind of  life she was totally unprepared for. She finds herself in the world of Geisha, and learns the Geisha trade where she eventually becomes one of the most desired Geisha in Japan. Told from a first person point of view, this book explores in detail the daily life of  the Geisha, various stages of the Geisha training, the competitions, and  rivalries among the Geisha and the ultimate sale of the Geisha’s virginity.  Though leisurely paced, the reader is taken  through twists and turns of the plot and is made to feel real sympathetic to the  strong willed and determined Sayuri – who decides to go by the wishes of her heart rather than the dictates of the society. You find  a lot of cultural elements and language that evokes  a strong sense of place that depicts the culture and tradition of the Japanese in a very realistic fashion..

Appeal Characteristics: Compelling; lyrical; richly detailed, leisurely paced, atmospheric; reflective, introspective, insightful, inspiring, detailed, homespun; Leisurely-Paced; Evocative, sympathetic, introspective – Japanese culture, single character development over time, explores interesting multiple  characters

Subject Headings: Geishas, Artisans, competition in women, Women entertainers,

Prostitution, Women friendship, Men/women relationships, Jealousy in women, First loves, 20th century

3 Best Appeal Terms: Leisurely paced, Compelling, Reflective

Similar Fiction: 

My Antonia by  Carter, Willa – Shares similar tone and plot  as Memoirs of a Geisha -The story of an orphaned girl who struggles from a young age…

Reflective, Homespun, Bittersweet, Narrative style –

The whistling season by Doig, Ivan – Set in the early 1900s, has a very strong sense of place, Moving, Reflective, Nostalgic, Descriptive, Atmospheric. Readers who loved these elements in Memoirs of a Geisha would also love this novel.

The commoner by Schwartz, John Burnham

Those who loved Memoirs of a Geisha will also love this because they both share similar themes –  Where one from a lowly beginning finds love and rises to top – a commoner marries into royalty. Novel set in Japan, evokes language and cultural elements.  Gives a good insight into the culture and tradition of the Japanese. Has similar narrative style, from first person point of view.

Similar Non-fiction:

Autobiography of a Geisha by Masuda, Sayo

Masuda recounts from a first person point of view life as a Geisha.  This book exposes both the glamour and the indignity surrounding “Geisha”. Readers of Memoirs of a Geisha would be enthralled.

Japanland: a year in search of wa by Muller, Karin

An american film maker travels to Japan to explore the customs and traditions of the people.  We get an insight into the life of geishas, samurai and other communities.  Readers who loved memoirs of a Geisha would thoroughly enjoy this true life account on what goes behind closed doors of these customs.

Women of the pleasure quarters: the secret history of the geisha by Downer, Leslie

This is a well researched  book that delves more into the history of the Geisha.  A fascinating read by anyone curious about how “Geisha” came to be.

By: Vera

 

The Color of Water

August 14, 2012

Author:  James McBride

Title:  The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother

Genre:  Nonfiction, Multicultural, Biography, Memoir

Publication Date:  1996

Number of Pages: 285

Geographical Setting:  Suffolk, Virginia, New York City

Time Period:  1930s-1990s.

Series:  N/A

Plot Summary:  “God is the color of water. Water doesn’t have a color.”

Growing up, James McBride noticed his mother did not look like him or his eleven brothers and sisters.  She didn’t look like anyone in the New York projects where they lived.  He would repeatedly ask her why she does not look like they do; she’d reply she was light skinned, that was she was a human being and not to worry about it, anything to not talk about it.  None of that matter to her; what mattered was school and church.  As an adult, James persuaded his mother, Ruth to tell her story.  She shared the story of a Jewish girl born in Poland to a Rabbi and her loving mother, immigrating to the United States, and raised in the south.  When she was twenty, she escaped to Harlem, where she married a black man in the 1940s, and converted to Christianity, thereby renouncing her Jewish background and family.  This biographical memoir takes the readers into Ruth’s world, growing up in the 1930’s to the present, while also taking readers into James’s upbringing in Ruth’s household in the 1960s.

Subject Headings:  Racially mixed people – New York (State) – New York – Biography, Mothers – New York (State) – New York – Biography, Whites – New York (State) – New York – Biography, Racially mixed people –Race identity, New York (N.Y.) – Biography.  Family and Relationships – Families.  Biography – Everyday People.  Christianity.  Judaism.

Appeal:  Inspirational, character-driven, heartwarming, thoughtful, leisurely-paced, steady, compassionate, flawed, realistic, sympathetic, family-centered, intimate, thoughtful.

3 appeal terms that best describe this book:  Inspirational, character-driven, thoughtful.

3 Relevant Non-Fiction Works and Authors:

Life on the Color Line: The True Story of a White Boy Who Discovered He was Black by Gregory Howard Williams.  The author recounts the shocking experience of learning his father’s relatives in Indiana were poor and Black and the resulting prejudice him and his brother experienced from both sides.  Like Color of Water, these two memoirs address a young man’s search for his racial and ethnic identity while growing up with a white mother and an African-American father.

The Color of Love: A Mother’s Choice in Jim Crow South by Gene Cheek.  This memoir presents a story surrounding the year 1963 in during the Jim Crow era, where the author was removed from his mother’s custody because she has a half-mixed baby.  While the exact circumstances differ, both books are moving accounts of the southern United States, racial tension, poverty and the struggle for identity and feeling of belonging.

The Provincials: A Personal History of Jews in the South by Eli N. Evans, Willie Morris.  This is a classic portrait of Jews in the South.   Authors Evans and Morris takes readers inside the nexus of southern and Jewish histories.  This book gives the reader a closer look to what it was like to be Jewish in the south, straddling the line between black and white, that Ruth McBride Jordan experienced.

 Relevant Fiction Works and Authors (why they are similar):

Stopping for Green Lights by Alyce Miller.  This coming of age book set in the 1960s is about a cynical young white woman, yearning to fit in with her Black friends, falling in love with a nineteen year old Black man, who teaches her a hard lesson by his betrayal.  This fictional account shares similar subject and appeal terms, like coming of age, racial identity and the sixties, which was part of the back drop in The Color of Water.

Joshua’s Bible by Shelly Leanne. Philadelphia minister Joshua Clay is sent to South Africa, to be the first black minister in years.  He struggles to minister during the apartheid-era 1930s.  This story shares the Christianity tones, racial struggle and adversity during a time period that was featured in The Color of Water.

The Wonder Spot by Melissa Bank. This fictional tale follows observations by Sophie Applebaum of her Jewish Pennsylvania family over the course of twenty years.  This story is a readalike because it features the dynamic of a Jewish family.

Name:  Olivia Button

American Born Chinese

August 8, 2012

Author: Gene Luen Yang , Ill. Lark Pien

Title: American Born Chinese

Genre: Comic Books; Graphic Novels

Publication Date: 2006

Number of Pages: 233

Geographical Setting: American suburbs

Time Period: Contemporary

Series: Not Applicable

Plot Summary: American Born Chinese consists of three seemingly unconnected stories that come together in a complex, surprising, and heart-warming way. The first story is based on a Chinese fable about the Monkey King. The Monkey King wants to become an immortal god, but in trying to become something he is not, he defies his inner nature and upsets Tze-Yo-Tzuh (the god who created existence). The second story is about Jin Wang, who after moving to a suburb from San Francisco, just wants to fit in at school. Jin wants to be popular, play basketball, make friends, and date the American girl he has fallen in love with. Instead, he meets Wei-Chen, a Taiwanese boy who only increases the bullying and decreases Jin’s chances for becoming popular. Lastly, Chin-Kee is Danny’s cousin visiting from China, and every time Chin-Kee visits he turns Danny into a high school outcast. Danny has had to change schools several times, and at his current school he is does not want to give up his popularity. American Born Chinese is a layered, magical, and an insightful story about being happy with who you are, what you have, and being true to yourself.

Subject Headings: Graphic novels. Chinese Americans — Fiction. Identity — Fiction. Schools — Fiction. Cartoons and comics. Michael L. Printz Award — 2007.

Appeal: engaging, fast-paced, flawed, insightful, realistic, sympathetic, layered, multiple points of view, magical

3 terms that best describes this book: humorous, character-centered, plot twists,

3 Nonfiction Read-a-likes:

Writing and Illustrating the Graphic Novel, Daniel Cooney

If American Born Chinese inspired you to try your hand at drawing and writing your own graphic novel, then check out Writing and Illustrating the Graphic Novel. This book will teach you how to draw lifelike illustrations, write exciting dialogue, and become a published author.

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Dating for Teens, Susan Rabens

Just like Jin Wang in American Born Chinese, teens agonize over how to ask someone on a date. If you are a teen trying to figure out dating, then check out The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Dating for Teens. This book will talk about how to ask, how to handle rejection, how to discuss it with your parents, and much more. Or, this would be a great book for Mom or Dad to read in order to have a better understanding for how to start a conversation with your teen about dating.
Monkey: Folk Novel of China, Arthur Waley
This acclaimed translation from Arthur Waley, makes this western fable of the Monkey King accessible to English speaking natives. In American Born Chinese, Yang retells the Monkey King fable, in this translation learn and read the origins of this sixteenth century Chinese fable.
3 Fiction Read-a-likes:

Anya’s Ghost, Vera Brosgol

Anya’s Ghost is a magical realist story about Anya who is trying to fit in at high school, but it is a one-hundred-year-old ghost named Emily that helps Anya figure out high school. The flawed characters and the combination of the magical and realistic features to this graphic novels plot, makes this a great read-a-like for American Born Chinese.

The Accidental Genius of Weasel High, Rick Detorie

A realistic fiction novel interspersed with comic strips, this is a great coming-of-age story about a young boy named, Larkin Pace who is obsessed with films and his best friend since third grade, Brooke. Similar to American Born Chinese, Brosgol’s story is realistic, humorous, character-centered, and is about teenagers that have just entered the dating world.

The Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian, Sherman Alexie

Junior leaves his Spokane Indian reservation and attends a high school where the only other Native American is the mascot. Similar to American Born Chinese, this is a realistic, engaging, and insightful story about trying to fit into high school.

Name: Alison Kulczak

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

July 30, 2012

Author: Ransom Riggs

Title: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Genre: Mystery

Publication Date: 2011

Number of Pages: 352

Geographical Setting: Florida; Wales, British Isles

Time Period: 1940; 2011

Series: Not Applicable

Plot Summary: Ransom Riggs’s debut novel is filled with old, mysterious, and strange photographs of people doing incredible things such as, levitating and lifting a boulder. How people captured these images is a mystery in itself, but what is more fascinating is how Riggs integrates these images into his narrative. Growing up Jacob Portman’s grandfather, Abe, told him of incredible children he knew at an orphanage in the British Isles that Abe escaped from Poland too during WWII. Jacob rejects these stories until witnessing his grandfather’s brutal death. His death inspires Jacob’s journey to the British Isles in order to solve the mystery that was his Grandfather’s life. This book incorporates fantasy, history, magical realism, and thus will appeal to multiple genre readers. The mystery in the story is what propels the plot and hooks the reader. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is a Young Adult novel that has captured the attentions of teenagers and adults alike because of it’s complex plot that incorporates time travel, history, and fantasy with the traditional coming-of-age story that only Riggs’s sophisticated storytelling could tell so well.

Subject Headings: Orphanages — Fiction. Islands — Fiction. Mystery and detective stories. Mystery fiction.

Appeal: compelling, suspenseful, psychological, vivid, sympathetic, detailed setting, plot twists, sophisticated, imaginative

3 terms that best describes this book: builds in intensity, well crafted, complex

3 Nonfiction Read-a-likes:

Journey through the British Isles, Harry Cory Wright

Photographer, Harry Cory Wright, captures the beautiful, rural landscape of the British Isles. Explore pictures of the mountains, wooded glades, and beaches that will transport you to these islands. If in, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, you were a fan of the setting in the British Isles, then this book will help you visualize the world that Riggs so evocatively describes.

On the Home Front: Growing Up in Wartime England, Ana Stalcup

Join Ana Stalcup describe her life growing up during WWII wartime England. She discusses what it was like to have soldiers stay in her home, constantly seeing soldiers in her city, and dealing with the slow progress of the war. This book will provide detailed, historical background for what it was like growing up during WWII, similar to the children in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.
Freak Show: Presenting Human Oddities for Amusement and Profit, Robert Bogdan
Between 1840 and 1940, hundreds of people journeyed across America to display their incredible talents as sideshows or as a part of circuses. In the shows you could see Siamese twins, bearded ladies, and dwarves. Similar to Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the orphans in the story would travel and display their strange abilities, and in Freak Shows learn about real people who traveled to display their skills. Also, there are interesting black and white photographs like in Riggs’s story, if as the reader, these mysterious photos peaked your interest.

3 Fiction Read-a-likes:

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Jonathan Safran Foer

Another great Young Adult book for adults that incorporates unusual photographs, sympathetic characters, and solving the secrets of lost loved ones. Oskar Schell loses his father during the attacks on the World Trade Center, and Oskar is left to find a lock that his father’s mysterious key opens. Foer’s book is similar to Riggs’s because it is also psychological, sophisticated, and well crafted.

Big Fish: a Novel of Mythic Proportions, Daniel Wallace

When Edward Bloom was a boy his father traveled a lot and while growing up, Edward never felt as if he really knew his father. Whenever his father was home, his father would describe his travels as tall tales. As Edward’s father is dying, Edward tries to learn the truth about his father’s life and these tall tales. A great read-a-like choice for Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children if they enjoy unearthing strange, mysterious pasts, compelling plots, magical realism elements, and family relationships.

11/22/63, Stephen King

Jake Eppingis has been enlisted to travel back in time to change history, and prevent the assassination of JFK. Readers who enjoyed routing for Jacob in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, will enjoy following and sympathizing with Jake in 11/22/63. Also, if in Rigg’s story you enjoyed the time travel, the history, and the detailed and atmospheric setting, then check out King’s new suspense story.

Name: Alison Kulczak

Fun Home

April 11, 2012

Author: Alison Bechdel

Genre: Autobiography; Graphic novels (Nonfiction); Memoirs; Family and relationships; Adult books for young adults;

Publication Date: 2006

Number of Pages: 232

Geographical Setting: Pennsylvania

Time Period:  1960’s – early 1980’s

Series (If applicable): n/a

Plot Summary: This graphic memoir—graphic as in comic strip, not explicit (though there is an explicit moment)—centers around the author’s slow revelation that she is a lesbian and her relationship with her closeted English teacher/historical house restorer/funeral home director father.  It’s full of references to Greek myths and American novels and plays that will please literary folks and non-literary types as the graphic representations help convey the meaning of the references.  This dark but not depressing multiple award nominee and winner will appeal to readers that like a more mature coming-of-age memoir.

Subject Headings: Bechdel, Alison, 1960 – Comic books, strips, etc.; Father and daughter; Closet gay men; Lesbian teenagers – Coming out; Brothers; English language teachers;  Gay men; Undertakers and undertaking; Parent and child; Children of divorced parents; Funeral homes; Teacher-student relationships; Divorce; Death; Historic preservation; Cartoonists – United States.

Appeal: candid; darker; humorous; introspective; melancholy; moving; moody; poignant; reflective; sophisticated; thoughtful; eccentric; quirky; realistic; sympathetic; well-developed; authentic; character-centered; issue-oriented; literary references; accurate; contemporary; accessible; chatty; conversational; direct; frank; informal; smart; straightforward; witty; award winner.

3 appeal terms that best describe this book: witty; reflective; candid

3 Relevant Non-Fiction Works and Authors

Epileptic by David B.  This is another moving and thoughtful memoir told in a graphic medium.  Epileptic, like Fun Home, is about a family with problems and how the author came out of the experience, though the problems are different.

You’ll Never Know by Carol Tyler.  This moving and thoughtful story is the first book in this 3-part graphic novel/memoir that centers around the author’s relationship with her father and how it affected her later relationships.  Bechdel’s memoir Fun Home is also a moving and thoughtful graphic novel/memoir that focuses on her relationship with her father.

Running with Scissors by August Burroughs.  It’s not a graphic novel but, like Fun HomeRunning with Scissors is a candid, engaging and witty coming-of-age memoir.

3 Relevant Fiction Works and Authors

A Family Matter by Will Eisner.  Though this candid graphic novel only covers a day in the life, it too reveals family secrets that include suppressed dark family secrets.

Martin Bauman: or, A Sure Thing by David Leavitt is also a character-driven, moody and witty coming-of-age novel. Though this tale about an insecure writer struggling to come out of the closet may be based on the author’s own life, it seems that Leavitt may have also had a mentor-type figure that strongly shaped the author’s life.

Escape from “Special” by Miss Lasko-Gross is a coming-of-age graphic novel of a girl trying to get through a difficult childhood with hippie parents.  The muted colors of the artwork is similar to Fun Home (Fun Home uses grayish blues and Escape uses smoky grays) in that it evokes a moody tone throughout the darkly humorous story.

Name: Ally C.

The Evening Crowd at Kirmser’s: A Gay Life in the 1940s

April 11, 2012

Title: The Evening Crowd at Kirmser’s: A Gay Life in the 1940s

Author:Richard J. Brown and William Reichard

Genre: LGBT

Publication Date: April 2003

Number of Pages: 155

Geographical Setting: Minnesota

Time Period:World War 2, 1940s

Plot Summary: The author is a naval recruit who is removed from miliatry servive after being discovered as a gay man and is forced to return home to Minnesota. Once there, he finds a small bar named Kirmser’s in St. Paul run by two German immigrants. By day the bar is home to typical blue collar workers but at night it transforms into a meeting place for gays and lesbians after the war. The book follows the author and his friends on a journey of personal acceptance and disapproval from the mass populace.

Subject Headings:

Brown, Ricardo J.
Gay journalists — United States — Biography
Homosexuality — Saint Paul, Minnesota — History
Gay men — Saint Paul, Minnesota — History
The Forties (20th century)

Appeal: Informative, detailed, moving, powerful, inspiring, descriptive, bittersweet, accessible, passionate, thoughtful, tragic, realistic, sympathetic,

3 Appeal Terms that Best Describe the Book: Moving, sympathetic, powerful

Similar Authors and Works (why are they similar?):

3 Relevant Non-Fiction Works and Authors:

Stonewall – Martin Baumi Duberman

A good choice for anyone who wishes to learn more about the history of the gay pride movement. Stonewall is half history book and half biography of six men and women personally involved in the Stonewall riots of the 60s when groups of gay men and women fought back against the police.

Coming out Under Fire: The History of Gay Men & Women In World War 2 – Allan Berube

Filled with letters and interviews by gay veterans, the book delves into the standing of gays in the military during this era, as well as how these gay soldiers subsequently changed their government and leaders.

Tales of the Lavender Menace: A Memoir of Liberation – Karla Jay

A memoir of Karla Jay’s life working as a student activist for the women’s liberation movement throughout the 60s & 70s. Perfect for anyone who wants to read about civil rights and the oppressed overcoming bigotry.

3 Relevant Fiction Works and Authors:

More of This World or Maybe Another –  Barb Johnson

Winner of the Stonewall award for Literature, this novel follows four friends in New Orleans who are dealing with different struggles such as poverty, violence and homosexuality.

The City and the Pillar – Gore Vidal

A contemporary novel about a gay man’s coming of age in post-World War II America. Jim and Bob were childhood friends, but after years apart Jim strikes out on his own in the hopes of finding Bob again and rekindling their friendship.

A Single Man – Christopher Isherwood

George, a college professor, is adjusting to life on his own after the sudden death of his partner and contemplates taking his own life. The book follows a day in his life as he tries to cope with what might be his last day alive while still teaching and going through his daily routine. An excellent film version of this book was made starring Colin Firth and directed by Tom Ford.

Name: Courtney Rose

Tuesdays with Morrie

April 11, 2012

Author: Albom, Mitch

Title: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson

Genre: Non-fiction

Publication Date: 2002

Number of Pages: 192

Geographical Setting: United Stated (Detroit and Boston)

Time Period: Current

Series (If applicable): N/A

Plot Summary:  Mitch Albom is a sports journalist in Detroit. He coincidentally catches a glimpse of his old professor, Morrie Schwartz, while watching TV and learns that he is battling Lou Gehrig’s Disease. Having made a promise 16 years ago to keep in touch, he finally goes to visit him. Through his visits with Morrie every Tuesday, whom he calls coach, he begins his final lesson in life. He puts everything on hold as he begins to organize his own life first. This book is very deep and moving, full of inspiration and many thought provoking subjects. It’s a book that will leave everyone in tears from beginning to end.

Subject Headings: Schwartz, Morrie S.
Brandeis University Faculty Biography.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Patients United States Biography.
Teacher-student relationships United States Case studies.
Death Psychological aspects Case studies. Life lesson.

Appeal: fast-paced, passionate, gentle, heartwarming, moving, philosophical, inspiring, sympathetic, intimate, thought-provoking, deep, enlightening, and conclusive

3 appeal terms that best describe this book:  moving, inspirational, and heartwarming

Similar Authors and Works (why are they similar?):

3 Relevant Non-Fiction Works and Authors:

Pausch, Randy and Jeffrey Zaslow – The Last Lecture (Randy Pausch is a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon who was disagnosed with terminal cancer and he decides to give a last lesson about living)

Callanan, Maggie – Final Gifts: understanding the special awareness, needs, and communications of the dying (Story of two nurses, Maggie Callanan and Patricia Kelley, sharing their intimate experience of tending to terminally ill patients)

Canfield, Jack, et al. – Chicken Soup for the Soul: Teacher Tales: 101 Inspirational stories from great teachers and appreciative students (Stories from both students and teachers with their memories and lessons in and out of school)

3 Relevant Fiction Works and Authors:

Coelho, Paulo – The Alchemist (A journey by a shepherd boy name Santiago. He travels from Spain to Egypt and teaches the readers about the wisdom of listening to our hearts as he reads the omens and teaches us to follow our dreams)

Hesse, Hermann – The Journey to the East (A journey of a man in search of enlightenment while struggling with spiritualism)

Gaines, Ernest J. – A Lesson Before Dying (Jefferson was sent to prison for a crime he did not commit. There, he is visited by a teacher names Grant Wiggins. Through the visits, both men rediscover themselves.)

Name: Jun Yoon

The Next Always

April 4, 2012

Author: Nora Roberts

Genre: Contemporary Romance

Publication Date: 2011

Number of Pages: 352

Geographical Setting: Boonsboro, Maryland

Time Period: Present

Series (If applicable): Book One of The Inn Boonsboro Trilogy

Plot Summary: Clare is a war widow who has returned to her hometown with her three young sons.  Beckett Montgomery and his brothers are remodeling the Inn BoonsBoro, which happens to be across the street from Clare’s bookshop.  Beckett’s unrequited love for his best friend’s widow may finally have a chance now that Clare’s moved back to their quaint hometown. The author’s richly detailed descriptions of the small town and the remodeling project with a touch of the supernatural nicely frame the budding romance between Clare and Beckett .

Subject Headings: Small towns; Historic buildings – conservation and restoration; Second chances; Architects; Infatuation; Hotels; Single mothers; Widows; Booksellers; Homecomings; Small town life; First loves; Men/women relations.

Appeal: easy, engrossing, descriptive, richly detailed, strong sense of place, leisurely-paced, relaxed, unhurried, atmospheric, comfortable, heartwarming, hopeful, lighthearted, magical, optimistic, romantic, engaging, familiar, realistic, recognizable, series (characters), strong secondary characters, sympathetic, contemporary, detailed setting, small-town, accessible, colloquial, conversational, simple, unembellished, details of small town, details of restoration of old building.

3 appeal terms that best describe this book: comfortable; heartwarming; richly detailed.

3 Relevant Non-Fiction Works and Authors

Under the Tuscan Sun  by Frances Mayes.  Under the Tuscan Sun and The Next Always both evoke strong sense of place using lush descriptions of the small towns where the story takes place and rich details of renovating once magnificent buildings (Mayes a countryside villa and Roberts an Inn).  Both also follow a love story that is framed by the restoration process.

The Reluctant Tuscan by Phil Doran.  Doran amusingly recounts his relocation from LA where he was a TV producer to a tiny Tuscan town where he and his wife embark upon remodeling a 300 year old farmhouse. Doran’s optimism and witty commentary lead up to a happy-ever-after that The Next Always readers will appreciate.

My Boyfriend’s Back: True Stories of Rediscovering Love with a Long-Lost Sweetheart by Donna Hanover.  Beckett’s love for Clare has been unrequited since high school, but he gets a second chance with her in The Next Always.  Like the title suggests, My Boyfriend’s Back explores true stories of first loves rekindled later on in life. Both books will leave readers feeling hopeful about loves from the past.

3 Relevant Fiction Works and Authors

The Wedding Dress by Virginia Ellis. This light, heart-warming historical fiction by Ellis (who typically authors romance novels) centers around a Civil War widow and her sisters as they try to find hope in a bleak post-war life by sewing a wedding dress for the youngest sister.  Like The Next Always, The Wedding Dress offers hope, love, a happy ending, and even a ghostly twist.

The Inn at Eagle Point by Sherryl Woods.  This is the heartwarming first book of in the contemporary romance series, Chesapeake Shores.  Like the Inn Boonsboro Trilogy, Chesapeake Shores is about second chances and men/women relations and gives readers a strong sense of place.

Virgin River by Robyn Carr.  Virgin River is a leisurely-paced contemporary romance about a widow looking to start over in a small town.  A strong sense of place and a heartwarming story will appeal to readers who enjoyed The Next Always.

Name: Ally C.

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

March 26, 2012

Author: Chua, Amy

Title: Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Genre: Non-Fiction

Publication Date: 2011

Number of Pages: 237

Geographical Setting: America

Time Period: Current

Series (If applicable): N/A

Plot Summary: A story of a Chinese born American mother exercising extreme parenting. Amy Chua is married to a Caucasian husband and has two daughters. She raises them the “Chinese” way because she believes the Western way of parenting would not prepare them enough for the future. She has her children playing violin and piano, and makes them work hard to become number one. A few things she lists in her book that she does not allow her daughters to do are:

  • Have a playdate
  • Be in a school play
  • Complain about not being in a school play
  • Not be the #1 student in every subject except gym and drama
  • Play any instrument other than the piano or violin
  • Not play the piano or violin

This book shows the difference between the stereotypical way of Eastern and Western parenting. This book is dramatic, full of bittersweet relationships between mother and daughters, and is also heartwarming. This is a memoir of a competitive, prideful Chinese mother raising her children the “Chinese” way, and should not be taken as a sort of parenting guide.

Subject Headings:Chua, Amy.
Mothers United States Biography.
Chinese American women Biography.
Mothers and daughters China.
Mothers and daughters United States.

Appeal: moderately-paced, bittersweet, compassionate, dramatic, heartwarming, moving, inspiring, intriguing, realistic, sympathetic, family-centered, academic, ambitious, prideful, funny, and well-written.

3 appeal terms that best describe this book: Bittersweet, dramatic, and heartwarming

Similar Authors and Works (why are they similar?):

3 Relevant Non-Fiction Works and Authors:

Tung, May Pao-may – Chinese Americans and Their Immigrant Parents: conflict, identity, and values (Book about dilemmas the younger and older Chinese generations must face in American Society as well as the differences between the two cultures)

Loh, Sandra Tsing – Aliens in America (A struggle of a girl and her parents, a German mother and a Chinese father, in America)

Mah, Adeline Yen – Falling Leaves: the true story of an unwanted Chinese daughter (The journey of a young Chinese girl as she searches for acceptance, love, and understanding)

3 Relevant Fiction Works and Authors:

Bates, Judy Fong – Midnight at the Dragon Café (Story of a Chinese mother and daughter living in Ontario in the 1950s, trying to forge their lives in a foreign land)

Carter, Forrest – The Education of Little Tree (Childhood remembrance of an orphaned American Indian boy living in Tennessee with his Cherokee grandparents)

Tan, Amy – The Joy Luck Club (Story of two generations of Chinese American women and their daughters)

Name: Jun Yoon

Will Grayson, Will Grayson

March 21, 2012

Author: Green, John (and David Levithan)

Genre: GLBT, Literary Fiction

Publication Date: 2010

Number of Pages: 310

Geographical Setting: Chicago

Time Period: Current

Series (If applicable): N/A

Plot Summary:  Will Grayson and will grayson, are troubled teens that live around the Chicagoland area. One is straight (Will Grayson) and the other is gay (will grayson). The straight Will Grayson is a teen who does not want to draw attention nor be noticed by anyone, but having a friend named Tiny Cooper, who is a big lovable gay teen who is in search of romantic relationships and is planning to make a fabulous musical about his life, does not help. The gay will grayson is a teen who has nothing good going on in his life, except for a boy he met online named Isaac and his friend Maura. Both Will Grayson and will grayson end up crossing paths when will grayson goes to meet Isaac. This meeting changes the lives of Will Grayson, will grayson, Tiny Cooper, and Maura, who has an interest in will grayson. This story is dramatic throughout the book and is very realistic. The story is very moving, full of bittersweet romance but funny.

Subject Headings: Interpersonal relations Juvenile fiction – Dating (Social customs) – Homosexuality – Overweight persons – Theater – Names, Personal fiction – Chicago (Ill.) Fiction.

Appeal: Fast-paced, intricately plotted, bittersweet, funny, gentle, dramatic, moving, hopeful, romantic, thoughtful, compassionate, multiple points of view, realistic, strong secondary character, touching, thought-provoking, and sympathetic.

3 appeal terms that best describe this book: Bittersweet, funny, and touching.

Similar Authors and Works (why are they similar?):

3 Relevant Non-Fiction Works and Authors:

Huegel, Kelly – GLBTQ: the survival guide for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning teens (Guide/advice for GLBTQ teens)

Swain, Keith W. – Dynamic Duos: the alpha/beta key to unlocking success in gay relationships (A guide for gay men to finding Mr. Right)

Bergquist, Kathie – A Field Guide to Gay & Lesbian (A guide for gay and lesbians around the Chicago).

3 Relevant Fiction Works and Authors:

Elkeles, Simone – Perfect Chemistry (series) (A love relationship between two teenagers, where their friends disapprove of their relationship. This is told in multiple perspectives and it is a realistic fiction)

Hopkins, Ellen – Tricks (GLBT/realistic fiction told in multiple perspectives. A story of five teenagers that falls into prostitution and tries to find their way back to freedom and happiness)

Magruder, James– Sugarless (GLBT fiction which takes place in Chicago suburbs. A story about a teen who copes with his life by joining a speech team. He later has an affair with a speech coach from a rival school).

Name: Jun Yoon